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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 57-63

Assessment of visual acuity of commercial long-distance drivers in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria


1 Department of Community Health, Ophthalmology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria
2 Department of Community Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Delta State University Abraka, Delta State, Nigeria
3 Department of Ophthalmology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria
4 Department of Community Health, College of Health Sciences, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Kingsley C Okafor
Department of Community Health, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State 903101
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_19_19

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Objective To assess the visual acuity of commercial long-distance drivers in Benin City, Nigeria. Patients and methods A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used, and data were collected for 315 commercial long-distance drivers and their vehicles from January to October, 2013. Respondents were recruited using systematic random sampling technique. The study instruments included structured interviewer-administered questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS, version 20. Results The results showed that 114 (36.2%) drivers were within the age group of 31–40 years. Most of the respondents [272 (86.3%)] were married; almost all the respondents [311 (98.7%)] were males, whereas four (1.3%) were surprisingly females. More than half of the respondents [172 (54.6%)] had a secondary level of education, whereas 12 (3.8%) had no formal education. Less than a tenth [30 (9.5%)] were visually impaired, with two (0.6%) having severe visual impairment, whereas majority of respondents had normal visual acuity [285 (90.5%)]. There were statistically significant associations between the respondents’ level of education (P<0.001) driving experience (P<0.001), blood pressure (P<0.007), and visual acuity. Regression analysis [odds ratio (95% confidence interval)] showed that respondents with secondary level of education and above were 2.762 (1.162–6.563) times more likely to have normal vision compared with their counterparts with primary level of education or none. Conclusion Approximately a tenth of the commercial drivers were visually impaired. This emphasizes the need for regular health checks, especially for visual screening and blood pressure measurement among this occupational group.


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